What Pregnant Women Need to Know About 5,797 Work-Related Complaints

Walmart pregnancy case

The Washington Post recently published a story about mammoth retailer Wal-mart’s new policy that allows pregnant women more options so that they can continue to work even late into their pregnancy. While this change of policy is a moral and economic victory for pregnant Wal-mart employees, it did not come without a fight.

In 2011, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission received 5,797 pregnancy-related complaints from women who represented all walks of life from a cashier to corporate executives who felt that they were discriminated against by their employers solely on the grounds of being pregnant. According to the National Women’s Law Center, almost 9 out of 10 women worked into their last two months of pregnancy which carries an increased risk of complications. Rather than allow the pregnant employees to change positions, work less hours or sit in a chair, many find themselves terminated or asked to take a temporary leave of absence that often times becomes permanent. Many are forced to use their Family Medical Leave time before having the baby and must rush back because they’ve run out of time.

Tiffany Beroid’s blood pressure started to rise as her pregnancy advanced. Her doctor gave her a light duty note but Wal-Mart told her they didn’t have light duty work, forcing her to take her pregnancy leave sooner than anticipated. Through social media efforts, pregnant employees of Wal-Mart with problems similar to Beroid’s began networking and an organization called Our Wal-Mart that is a labor union supported group began to advocate on Beroid’s behalf. She was also assisted by a work advocacy group called A Better Balance as well as the National Women’s Law Center.

March 5, 2014 became a day of victory for the thousands of pregnant employees of Wal-Mart when the company issued a new policy that allows its pregnant employees to perform less demanding work if they’re having difficulty fulfilling their duties.

All pregnant women are encouraged to become familiar with The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 in order to protect their rights. The policy changes of Wal-Mart are to be commended. Let’s hope other industries will follow suit.

Pregnant Mother Who Drove into the Ocean Will Remain in Hospital

ebony wilkerson

Thank God for common sense. For once, the state of Florida has done something right and kept Ebony Wilkerson, (the 32 year old pregnant mom who drove her kids into the ocean) into a hospital where she rightfully belongs. Wilkerson is 7 months pregnant and certainly doesn’t need to be in a jail where the chances of her having a healthy baby are greatly diminished. Had it not been for good Samaritans who ran into the Atlantic Ocean and rescued Wilkerson, three innocent children and an unborn baby would have met an untimely demise.
What is it about our country that prevents us from recognizing mental illness when it smacks us dead in the face? The fact that Wilkerson was interviewed and released by law enforcement agents three hours before she drove into the ocean is troubling. Mental illness is a public health disease and yet it’s treated as an afterthought in a “too-busy-society” that focuses more on entertainers’ wardrobes and scandals as opposed to its citizens that need immediate attention and intervention.
Pregnancy can bring out the best in women but it can also provoke anxiety, depression, social isolation, rejection, substance abuse and changes in economic status. Pregnant women who have mental illness might be reluctant to take their medications, which only makes their illness worse. Or, they might become victims of domestic violence because of their partners’ lack of desire to have children.
Thank goodness we can learn from our mistakes. Unless law enforcement officers have mental health training, they need to bring patients to an Emergency Department for further evaluation whether they appear to be “normal” or not. Psychiatrists should be alerted before a patient signs out against medical advice (as in the case of Wilkerson) to determine whether the patient needs medication and a possible court ordered stay.
It’s tragic that no one (with the exception of her sister) believed Wilkerson had a mental health problem until she drove her car into the ocean. How many more families will suffer before we finally get it right?

“Help! Our (Pregnant) Mommy is Trying to Kill Us!”

Pregnant mom drives car into the ocean

The three children (ages 3, 9 and 10) and the unborn baby of Ebony Wilkerson are lucky to be alive, despite the fact that she drove her van into the frigid Atlantic Ocean. Two hours prior to this horrific event, the Daytona Police interviewed her, deemed that she was sane and left. The day before, a local hospital kept her overnight for mental health observation for 24 hours and then sent her home. If I were the sister of Ebony Wilkerson, I’d speed-dial liability attorneys and then immediately request Wilkerson’s medical records because obviously someone dropped the proverbial ball.

Wilkerson’s sister knew something wasn’t right because Wilkerson exhibited paranoia and kept discussing Jesus and demons that she felt were controlling her. She had fled South Carolina because she believed that her ex-husband was attempting to kill her. Eerily, Wilkerson is from the same state where Susan Smith drove her children into the ocean 20 years ago and blamed the crime on an unknown man. Unlike Smith, whose children died; Wilkerson and her three children were gratefully rescued by a heroic group of men who selflessly plunged into the water to save them.

Kudos goes to Wilkerson’s sister who had the wisdom to call law enforcement and report her sister’s bizarre behavior and hide her car keys. Unfortunately Wilkerson had another set of keys. What’s troubling about this case is how Wilkerson was able to sign herself out of the hospital and how she fooled the police to thinking that she was sane which meant that didn’t have to “Baker Act” her or commit her to the hospital . I find it hard to believe that Wilkerson could walk out of a hospital after seeing a psychiatrist which leads me to speculate that perhaps the hospital didn’t have a psychiatrist on duty at the time.
Law enforcement officers are not trained mental health specialists. In the future, when they are called for a suspected mental health issue, a better approach might be to take the individual to the hospital, despite the appearance of a person’s “calm demeanor” and let the experts make or rule out the diagnosis of mental illness.

Mental illness is not a joke, America. It claims innocent lives every day.

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Pregnant Moms: Is a 1st Trimester Prenatal Screening Test Right for You?

DNA 2

If you start prenatal care early enough (in the 1st trimester), you will inevitably have to decide on whether you want to be tested for potential genetic problem such as Down syndrome (aka Trisomy 21) or other life-threatening genetic conditions. Terms such as non-invasive prenatal tests (aka NIPS), Integrative Screens and Alpha-Maternal Serum Testing will be hurled at you along with very specific time tables for getting these tests done. Ideally, you should receive extensive counseling so that you may make an informed decision but quite often this is not the case.
Knowing the difference between screening and diagnostic tests is a great way to begin your decision-making process. A screening test identifies potential problems and requires additional testing. A diagnostic test provides a definite answer. Diagnostic tests in the first trimester include chorionic villi sampling (aka CVS) and amniocentesis is usually done in the second trimester. Both of these tests are invasive and carry a small risk for miscarriages. Risk factors such as advanced maternal age (meaning greater than 35) also affect a pregnant woman’s decision because the risk for Down syndrome increases with age. The risk of having any type of genetic disorder is 1 in 190 for women age 35 and 1 in 65 for women age 40.
NIPS have gained in popularity over the past decade because they have a less than 2% false positive rate for detecting Down syndrome by the 10th week of pregnancy but this rate increases slightly for other lethal genetic problems such as trisomy 13 and 18. They work by measuring the amount of fetal DNA found in the mothers’ blood stream. This test does NOT test for open neural tube defects such as Spina Bifida.
The integrative screening test is also done in the first trimester by measuring four pregnancy hormones in the mother’s blood and requires an early ultrasound to measure the baby’s neck (aka “nuchal test”) to rule out Down syndrome and has a false positive rate of approximately 5%. It also requires a second trimester Maternal Serum Alpha Fetal Protein test to rule out open neural tube defects.
The NIPS tests are not cheap, require insurance coverage and costs between $800 to $2700. They also cannot determine future heart problems, whether you’re having twins or other fetal abnormalities. But again, they are the most accurate test regarding screening for Down syndrome.
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Is It Safe to Take Acetaminophen During Pregnancy?

pills

Acetaminophen (the generic brand of Tylenol) is one of the most prescribed drugs for pregnant women around the globe to treat fevers and mild pain. It was thought to be safe but now researchers in Denmark have just disrupted the obstetrical community by suggesting that there is an association between taking acetaminophen during pregnancy and hyperactive children who are diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
This is a profound disappointment to most prenatal care providers whose options are limited in what they can prescribe to pregnant women, especially for a fever. It appears that acetaminophen breaks up hormones and according to the researchers, “abnormal hormonal exposures in pregnancy may influence fetal brain development.”
Although the study reports investigating over 62,000 children, a word of caution must be exercised before making the assumption that acetaminophen is not safe for pregnant women. Remember that in this study:
• There was a stronger association between ADHD and acetaminophen if the mother took it for more than one trimester
• The researchers do not know exactly how many pills the pregnant mothers took
• The risks were greater for pregnant women who took large amounts of acetaminophen throughout their pregnancy
• They do not know if pain is associated with an increased risk of developing ADHD
According to the director of the Maternal-Fetal Medicine program at the Cleveland Clinic, it is important to remember that an association of acetaminophen and ADHD is not the same thing as saying acetaminophen causes ADHD and for that reason, he will continue to provide acetaminophen to his pregnant patients advising them to take it in the manner in which it is prescribed.
The take-home message is that most physicians are not going to change their prescribing patterns based on this study. Please consult with your physician or midwife before taking acetaminophen and only take them as prescribed.
Remember, a healthy pregnancy doesn’t just happen; it takes a smart mother who knows what to do. If you like what you read, please like me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/SmartMothersGuide or Twitter, yourobgyn@twitter.com

New Guidelines say Give First-Time Pregnant Women More Time in Labor

Courtesy of Virginiawomen'sbirthcenter.com

Courtesy of Virginiawomen’sbirthcenter.com

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and The Society for Maternal Fetal Medicine (aka high-risk obstetricians) have issued a new recommendation that is a game-changer in the manner that obstetrics is practiced: allow low-risk first-time pregnant moms more time in labor. This is assuming that the fetal tracing is normal and the mother does not have a fever, high blood pressure or a condition that could compromise her life or the life of her unborn baby. This recommendation is based on new evidence that demonstrates contradicts the old school Friedman Curve theory that active labor begins at 4 centimeters. It actually begins at 6 centimeters. This would be especially helpful to first-time teenage moms who might be forced to have future cesarean sections based on hospital rules and physician opinions if their first delivery was a cesarean section. The “once a C-section, always a C-Section” culture hits this particular group the hardest.
According to the new recommendations:
• Women should be allowed to push for at least two hours if they’ve given birth before, three hours if they are first-time mothers, and even longer in certain cases, such as when an epidural is used for pain relief.
• Vaginal delivery is the preferred option whenever possible and doctors should use techniques — forceps, for example — to assist with natural birth.
• Women should be advised to avoid excessive weight gain during pregnancy.
A word of caution should be offered about these recommendations: forceps deliveries are becoming a lost art and can cause more damage than good in the hands of an inexperienced provider and the “avoid excessive weight gain during pregnancy” is easier said than done for most women.
That being said, these new recommendations gives first-time pregnant women the right to step on the proverbial brakes, the next time someone wants to rush their delivery via a C-section.
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Brain Dead and Pregnant: A Moral Dilemma

Courtesy of politix.topix.com

Courtesy of politix.topix.com

The contradictions of life can be maddening. On one hand, we have the case of Jahi McMath, a 13-yearold girl who is brain dead on a mechanical ventilator that her family fought to maintain and on the other hand, there is Marlise Munoz, a 33 year-old mother of a 15 month old son, who collapsed on her kitchen floor from what appeared to be a blood clot to the lungs back in November. Munoz, according to her husband and family, never wanted to be on life support but the state of Texas ordered it when they discovered that she was 14-weeks pregnant. Should state law override the wishes of a patient because of her pregnancy?

The family of Munoz is concerned and angry about the state of Texas’s decision for a number of reasons. Munoz was without oxygen for over an hour before her husband found her on the floor which meant that the fetus was without oxygen as well. Medical experts believe this could cause serious problems for the unborn baby. Munoz’s father describes his daughter has having “rubbery arms that feel like a mannequin” which makes it difficult for him to visit her in the hospital. Munoz was very early in her second trimester (14 weeks), remote from delivering a baby, yet forced to be, as her father states, “a host for the fetus.” Who will have the ultimate responsibility of raising the child once the physicians intervene and deliver it via C. Section?

When John Peter Smith Hospital was confronted regarding their decision, they emphatically state that they are merely following the rule of law; however some medical ethics experts disagree and state that the hospital is misinterpreting the law. According to the New York Times, at least 31 states have adopted restrictive laws prohibiting physicians for ending life support for “terminally-ill pregnant women regardless of the patient’s wishes or her family’s.”

Should a brain dead pregnant woman lose her rights under the United States Constitution in order for the benefit of her unborn baby? I’d love to know what you think.